Talking About Games: Difficulty and the “Git Gud” Mentality

Difficult games are easy enough to find, and there are a lot of players who like them. And yet, it’s also easy to find people who use these games and their difficulty as a test of who is a “real” player. In this essay I explore why that gatekeeping mentality is harmful for the video game community as a whole.

Talking About Games: Intent and Execution

Sometimes we talk about games in terms of the intent behind them. Perhaps a part of the game isn’t fun, but the designers made it that way. But is that a good explanation? In this essay I argue that the intent behind a system should not be relied upon for deciding whether a video game’s systems are good or bad.

Moral Choices: Follow the Rules

When we make moral choices, we often fall back on a set of rules that are easy to remember and stick to. But it can be useful to take a closer look at those rules that we use. In this essay, I’ll look into the moral framework of deontology (i.e. “morality based on rules”), and examine how we might use deontological concepts to create richer moral choices and themes in video games.

Moral Choices: The Consequences of Our Actions

Moral choices in games are often framed around broad concepts of right and wrong that are usually given little additional thought. But what would happen if we started to dig into more detail about what makes actions moral and immoral? In this essay I’ll explain the moral philosophy of consequentialism and how it can be used to create richer moral choices within games.